Rare Earth Elements, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
Thulium, Heavy Rare Earth Elements, HREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
REE Facts | HREE Facts | LREE Facts | Rare Metal Resource
LREE : 57 Lanthanum | 58 Cerium | 59 Praseodymium | 60 Neodymium | 61 Promethium | 62 Samarium | 63 Europium | 64 Gadolinium
HREE : 65 Terbium | 66 Dysprosium | 67 Holmium | 68 Erbium | 69 Thulium | 70 Ytterbium | 71 Lutetium | 39 Yttrium
Thulium, Heavy Rare Earth Elements, HREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
The "Rarest of the Rare" Thulium, a Heavy Rare Earth Element
Tracy Weslosky, Editor, InvestorIntel
Source: REE Handbook

Thulium, REE Collection, ProEdge Media Corp. When is the last time you heard someone mention the rare earth thulium? Well, if you can't recall, don't be surprised. Thulium is the rarest of the rare earth elements. It was discovered by a Swedish chemist in 1879 and is described as a bright and silvery metal which can be sliced with a knife. Thulium is named after the ancient far North region of Thule often identified as Norway in modern times.

The most interesting aspect of the rare earth thulium is its ability to fluoresce and hence it's applications in lighting, medicine and dentistry. Thulium is used to reduce x-ray exposure and is used to generate laser beams for less-invasive surgical procedures. Thulium is also used in lasers that are used in laparoscopic and endoscopic medical procedures to aid in cutting and cauterizing.

In 1985, Phillips Lighting created the first "compact" metal halide lamp using thulium. This experimental "Thulium Lamp", was produced to provide improved neutral white light for commercial interior lighting. Today metal halide lamps using thulium, dysprosium and holmium are used in sports stadium illumination, movie and stage lighting, and commercial interior-exterior lighting. Lasers using chromium, thulium, holmium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG) are used in surgery, dentistry, atmospheric testing, and remote sensing.

Thulia, a pale green powder, is the name of the oxide variant of thulium. Thulia melts at 2,425°C. Thulium oxide only occurs in trace amounts in the bastnäsites at the Bayan Obo mine in China and at Mountain Pass, California, in the United States. Canada is also known to have sub-economic sources of thulium in Quebec, Saskatchewan and the Northwest Territories. The rare earth thulium has been previously mined in Russia and Kazakhstan however, today it is mainly sourced from the southern provinces of China, primarily Fujian, Guangdong, and Jiangxi.

Thulium is mined from a variety of ore minerals and deposits using various methods. Typically thulium is prepared by heating thulia to 950 °C for 15 hours. This is done to deplete the oxide of moisture, carbon dioxide and other compounds. As part of this process lanthanum and tantalum may also be mixed with the thulia.

For more information, please visit www.REEHandbook.com, the ultimate source for rare earth elements.

Thulium, Heavy Rare Earth Elements, HREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
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Thulium, Heavy Rare Earth Elements, HREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel
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Thulium, Heavy Rare Earth Elements, HREE, REE Facts, ProEdge Media Corp., InvestorIntel